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A Taddington Threesome.

Updated: Jul 4, 2019

Three of us set out for a sunny spin, aiming for the village of Taddington. Once upon a time Taddington used to support five hostelries but now only the Waterloo, which is situated a little out of the village on the A6, and the Queens Arms remain. The latter used to be known as the Miners Arms but changed its name to mark Queen Victoria's diamond jubilee. The three bygone boozers all lie on what today is known as Main Road although some 19th century census returns and maps have it as London Road, as the main London to Manchester route used to run through the village. Village life became a little quieter after 1937 when the bypass was opened, but the resulting fall off in passing trade may have led in some way to the closure of one of its bygone boozers.

Pedalling into the village from the start of the bypass takes a little effort. I do recall riding a 25 mile time trial once whose final quarter of a mile involved this little rise. A cruel end, but I digress. Now, as I was saying, pedalling into the village from the start of the bypass takes a little effort but we soon arrive at the first of the threesome.


The former George Hotel, Taddington.

The George Hotel sat on the corner of Main Road and Town End, just beyond the finish of the aforementioned time trial. Listed in the 1849 Post Office Directory, when it was in the care of one William Fogg, it continued to offer hospitality to travellers and locals alike for at least another hundred years. Quite when it finally closed its doors to the public I don't know, but on December 18th 1949 Sheffield and Hallamshire Motor Club ended their 30 mile Christmas Trial there and followed it with a Christmas Dinner and film show of 1949 motor sport in the evening. Who won? Mr. Wadsworth in his Ford. He probably found that last quarter of a mile easier than I did. Continuing up the hill in my lowest gear, 36/27 if you're sad enough to want to know, I pass the Queens Arms on my right before coming to the former Star Inn. My first reference to this bygone boozer is once again the 1849 Post Office Directory, and the last is in Kelly's 1912 edition. I've heard it said that at one time it housed part of a Norman font, presumably from the village church, which was used to wash the mugs and tankards. Its current use? Like many large inns in Peak District villages it's become self-catering holiday accommodation.


Taddington's former Star Inn having some utilities maintenance.

The third and final building to feature in this post used to be the Traveller's Rest. This beerhouse ceased appearing in directories shortly after the turn of the 20th century. This possibly coinciding with it becoming a Temperance establishment overnight. I wouldn't have bothered to continue to frequent it. Would you have? In the 1890s a William Needham was the licensee. Possibly he was related to one of the Needhams featured here, or those who kept the Golden Lion in Monyash, which will hopefully feature in some future post.


The former Traveller's Rest, Taddington.

Well, that's the bygone boozers dealt with. What about the ride? It turned out to be a very pleasant spin in the July sunshine, stopping to top up caffeine levels at the Old Smithy in Monyash, where there is a conveniently located defibrillator.


Flapjacks served. Coffees still with the barista.

A slight tailwind assist past Magpie Mine and then home via Youlgrave and Alport. All in all a very pleasant thirty miles.


A sunlit Magpie Mine.

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